Saturday, 10 February 2018

Chocolate Caramel Fudge

This decadent Chocolate Caramel Fudge recipe is a must try! Caramel is rippled into the traditionally made fudge before being coated with a semi dark chocolate and finished with sprinkles! 

How to make Chocolate Caramel Fudge

Imagine sinking your teeth into a piece of dark rich fudge, with pockets of caramel, the sweetness countered with a layer of semi dark chocolate!  Well, that's what you get with this homemade Chocolate Caramel Fudge recipe!   

Just look at those dribbles of caramel oozing from the cubes of decadent fudge!  Who could resist a piece, or two, of firm fudge with pockets of sweet smooth caramel!

Homemade traditional fudge



I must admit that the quantities for the caramel recipe, that I share further down the post, does produce a little more of this sweet amber nectar than you will need for the Chocolate Caramel Fudge.  But I'm sure you'd be more than happy to drizzle the remaining caramel over some ice cream, or even some pancakes, or why not use it in a buttercream or perhaps to finish off a showstopping cake!   If you don't need the left over caramel straight away just cover it over, or pour it into an airtight container, and store it in the fridge for up to two weeks.     

Caramel

I'm a huge fan of making my own fudge, you only need to ask Mr E's work colleagues who are more than happy to sample it!  Of course a traditional Vanilla Fudge is really good, but if you fancy something a little more elaborate then do check out our other fudge recipes, such as this Homemade Coffee and Walnut Fudge which marries together a popular flavour combination, Whisky Fudge which carries a wonderful burst of flavour, or this Double Chocolate Fudge with Mini Eggs which is perfect as an Easter Treat.  

 Homemade Coffee and Walnut Fudge Whisky Fudge Double Chocolate Fudge with Mini Eggs

And let's not forget our Raspberry and White Chocolate Fudge which is incredibly popular, with good reason!

Raspberry and White Chocolate Fudge


How to make traditional fudge.

 

There are a few ways that you can make your own fudge, such as in a microwave the method we used with our Cheat's Chocolate Orange Fudge, in a slow cooker, or even some really simple no cook fudge recipes (which I've seen on the net but have yet to try).  But being a traditional sort of girl I really do like the results that boiling the ingredients gives.

I realise that some some people may shy away from making fudge this way, but if you give it your complete attention and keep vulnerable people (as well as pets) out of the way, then the traditional fudge making method is certainly one to try.

If  you're new to making fudge I really would recommend investing in a good quality sugar thermometer.  The thermometer that I've been using with success for over 12 months is called a Thermospaula.  One of the many great things about it is that the thermometer is built into the spatula meaning that, as with many sugar thermometers which are clipped to the side of the pan and often slide down, there is no risk of it taking a false reading of the bottom of the pan.  It's also geat when it comes to tempering chocolate too, as well as making custard or taking the temperature of roasting meat!         


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If, however, you'd like to make the confectionery without a thermometer, there are a number of visual clues when making fudge which you can read about in my Double Chocolate Fudge recipe post.



So, here's how to make Chocolate Caramel Fudge.





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Chocolate Caramel Fudge
This decadent Chocolate Caramel Fudge recipe is a must try! Caramel is rippled into the traditionally made fudge before being coated with a semi dark chocolate and finished with sprinkles! 

Details
Prep time: Cook time:     Yield: 40 - 50 pieces

Specific Equipment
   Large heavy based pan, which holds a volume of at least 3L 
   Digital Sugar Thermometer (or see note f below)
   20cm x 20cm Brownie Tray (or similar)
Ingredients
For the Caramel
  • 100ml Water
  • 225g Caster Sugar
  • 200ml Double Cream
For the Fudge
  • 400ml Double Cream
  • 135ml Milk
  • 135g Unsalted Butter
  • 400g Light Muscovado Sugar
  • 200g White Caster Sugar
  • pinch of Salt
For the layer of Chocolate
  • 150g Chocolate
  • 100ml Double Cream
  • Sprinkles (optional)

Method
1. Start by making the caramel. Place the water into a pan (roughtly a 1L milk pan). Add the sugar carefully aiming not to splash it up the sides of the pan. Set the pan over a low to moderate heat to allow the sugar to dissolve into the water. Once dissolved, increase the heat under the pan a little. Without stirring allow the sugar to caramelise whilst the water evaporates. Once it is a moderate brown colour (similar to the brown of a corrugated cardboard box) add the cream. Be aware that the mixture will react to the cold of the cream by rising up the pan. Stir. Continue stirring until the caramel has reached 104℃ / 219℉ (see note b below). Pour the caramel into a bowl and set too cool.2. Prepare the tin. Lightly grease and fully line the brownie tin. Ensure that the greaseproof paper goes beyond the rim of the pan, this will help to remove the fudge once it has firmed up.3. Start to make the fudge element. Place the double cream, milk, butter and sugars into a large heavy based pan. Place over a low heat to allow the ingredients to melt. Constantly stir using a wooden spoon. Ensure all of the ingredients have completely melted before moving onto the next stage - you should no longer hear or feel the granulation of the sugar. Pay particular attention to the 'corner' of the pan when listening for sugar granulation.4. Affix the sugar thermometer to the pan. Set the digital thermometer to 117C /242F and attach it to the side of the pan. Ensure that the thermometer is secure and not touching the base of the pan. (Alternatively use a thermospatula which has the thermometer built into the spatula, or see note f below). 5. Boil. Increase the heat under the pan to allow it to come to the boil whilst stirring all of the time. Boil the mixture, whilst continuing to stir, until it reaches 117C / 242F. Please be careful - the mixture is very hot! You may find it helpful to wear an oven mitt in case of splashes from the sugar. 6. Leave alone. Once the required temperature has been reached, remove the pan from the heat and leave it undisturbed to cool down to 110C / 230F. This will only take a couple of minutes.7. Add the salt. Add a small pinch of salt to the pan. Mix well. 8. Beat. Beat the mixture with the wooden spoon vigorously until it is no longer shiny. 9. Pour into the prepared brownie pan. Pour the half of the fudge mixture into the prepared tin. Smooth it into the corners. Spoon blobs of the cooled caramel onto the fudge. Use a knife to marble it into the fudge (see note e below). Top with the remaining fudge. Spread the top layer of fudge out with the back of a spoon. Add a few more drops of caramel and use the knife to ripple into the fudge. Smooth the surface of the fudge with the back of a spoon as best you can (it will be getting thicker at this stage). 10. Cool. Set aside to cool at room temperature for at least three hours to firm up.11. Make the chocolate ganache. Pour the cream into a small pan and set over a medium heat. Allow the cream to heat through but avoid letting it boil. Meanwhile break the chocolate into small pieces. Add the chocolate pieces to the hot cream. Use a teaspoon to stir the ganache, gradually the chocolate will melt and the ganache will become smooth. 12. Decorate the fudge. Pour the warm chocolate ganache over the set fudge. Use the back of a spoon to level it off. Scatter over sprinkles (optional). Set aside to firm up.13. Slice into cubes. Once fully cold and firm use the excess greaseproof paper as handles to remove the fudge from the tin. Use a sharp knife to slice the fudge into bite sized pieces.14. Enjoy! 
Notes: a) Remember, melted sugar is incredibly hot! Do stir the fudge syrup carefully so as to avoid splashing yourself. b) Keep animals, children and other vulnerable people out of the way when making fudge and caramel. c) When heating the mixture and waiting for it to reach 117C / 242F it will feel as though the temperature is stuck at around 104C / 220F for ages. Be patient and keep stirring, it will eventually move and will then increase fairly rapidly. d) Once portioned, store the fudge in an airtight container in a cool place. It will last for up to 2 weeks if stored in the fridge.  Allow it to come back to room temperature before eating. e) You will have about half of the caramel left over. The excess could be used to decorate a cake, or it could be enjoyed drizzled over ice cream. Cover the left over caramel (or pour into an airtight container) and store in the fridge for upto 2 wks. f) If you're making fudge without a thermometer, it can be tested by dropping a small amount of fudge into a glass of cold water. It will form a 'soft ball' (or if you prefer your fudge a little firmer aim for 'firm ball' stage) when it is ready. Have a few drinking glasses by your oven hob filled with cold water before starting to make your fudge. Before testing wait for the molten sugar to climb up the sides of the pan and then drop back down. Boil for a further 3-4 minutes and then start to test.








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Find out how to make this decadent Chocolate Caramel Fudge.  It is made to a traditional fudge recipe by boiling the butter, cream and sugars on the hob.




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24 comments:

  1. Thanks for another crazy addictive fudge recipe Angie!! I just realized you have so many amazing fudge recipes here! I really need to buy myself a thermospatula to try a couple of these :)

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    Replies
    1. Hahahha, yeah there are one or two fudge recipes on the blog Deepika - what can I say, I quite like fudge ;-) Those thermospatulas are brilliant, so useful for so many baking tasks.
      Angela x

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  2. Ooh yes..... I can 'Imagine sinking my teeth into a piece of dark rich fudge, with pockets of caramel'...... But to be sure, I think you need to send some over ASAP! x

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  3. This is lovely, as always, looks so professional, the gooey caramel inside sounds great! If you ever decide to open up a little dessert shop let me know, I'd be a regular customer:)

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  4. wow I admire your fudge making skills - looks amazing and so delicious - chocolate caramel would be my fave flavour combo I think

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    Replies
    1. Aw thankyou Johanna, that trust me it really isn't difficult with a sugar thermometer - and it's so worth all of that stirring :-D
      Angela x

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  5. very decadent I bet the contrast in textures between the fudge and the caramel is delicious.

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    1. It's so yummy to come across a pocket of caramel Jacqui :-D
      Angela x

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  6. Oh wow Angela - what a recipe! I love those sprinkles :-D And I love the idea of drizzling that 'spare' caramel over ice cream or pancakes...YUM!! Eb x

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    Replies
    1. Haha, those sprinkles were made for this fudge weren't they - picked them up in Tesco on a whim really but so glad I did. And of course if you don't fancy the spare caramel on icecream or over pancakes tou could just use a spoon ;-)
      Thanks Eb :-D
      Angela x

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  7. I’ve been dreaming of this fudge ever since I saw it Instagram - it looks SO good! I’ve pinned the recipe and will definitely give it a try soon �� Many thanks, Nicola x

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    1. It's what dreams are mae of isn't it - so glad it featured in yours :-D Hope you enjoy it as much as we have Nickki :-)
      Angela x

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  8. Oh this fudge sounds amazing Angela, especially with the caramel swirled into it plus the chocolate ganache! Yummy! Thank you so much for sharing with #CookOnceEatTwice x

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  9. Oh My Goodness!!! YES PLEASE! Angela this looks and sounds amazing, I love fudge but have not had much success making it, I really must try again. Thank you for sharing with #CookBlogShare x

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    1. Haha, thankyou Kirsty :-) I really would recommend re-visiting fudge making when you get chance Kirsty. The first few times I tried to make fudge was an utter disaster but it's soooo much easier with a thermometer. :-)
      Angela x

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  10. oooooh Angela I would be so thrilled to have some of these on Valentines day - heck any day to be fair. Your homemade chocolates are always so beautiful x x

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    Replies
    1. You and me both Jenny - if you hadn't already guessed I'm a huge fan of fudge :-D
      Angela x

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