Friday, 8 December 2017

Homemade Whisky Fudge

Indulge friends with this Homemade Whisky Fudge.  Made using the traditional method, this fudge recipe is delicious carrying the flavour and aroma of whisky (whiskey).  It's perfect for offering as a gift to loved ones, or even treating yourself.

How to make homemade whisky (whiskey) fudge

Christmas is definitely the time to indulge, have fun and be merry.  Confectionery, and perhaps a little alcohol, certainly tick the indulgence box.  Whether it's a chocolate with beautifully crisp and shiny tempered shell like our Hazelnut Noisettes or our Coffee Cream Chocolates, homemade confectionery certainly makes for a delicious thoughtful give at Christmas (or any other time of year really!)

Hazelnut Noisettes Coffee Cream Chocolates

Alongside chocolates, fudge is another popular treat.  In this recipe I have combined Mr E's love of whisky in this easy to make confectionery.  Whisky fudge is nothing new, of course, but it's far tastier (and actually cheaper, assuming you have some of the hard stuff available) to make your own.

Whisky (whiskey) fudge recipe

Now, I have to admit that I'm not much of a drinker.  But once I tried a small piece of my most recent fudge recipe (do check out my other fudge recipes in my recipe index) I was soon reaching for a second (and third!) piece! Hic!  The aroma of the whisky is evident in the fudge, and the flavour, once married with the sweetness of the fudge, is delicious!   

And if you can bare to part with this homemade confectionery, why not package up a few pieces for friends and loved ones in a pretty paper bag or a small gift box which gives it a lovely professional feel.  Though do remember to keep a few pieces for yourself!


Whisky fudge makes for a great gift for loved ones

Now, if you're new to fudge making, it's quite difficult to boil the sugary mixture to the correct temperature (trust me, I've been there and got the t-shirt!) and so I must recommend that you use a decent digital thermometer when making your fudge (though if time is short and you're unable to purchase a sugar thermometer do check out my description of visual prompts when making fudge without a thermometer).  Thermometers aren't particularly expensive, about £15 or so, and if you're anything like me you'll certainly get your money's worth by using it time and again once you realise how easy it is to make your own homemade fudge! And that's before we even think about how incredibly tasty it is.  It certainly beats shop bought fudge in our opinion!   

Whisky (whiskey) fudge



So, here's how to make Homemade Whisky Fudge.





print recipe

Homemade Whisky Fudge
Indulge yourself and friends with this Homemade Whisky (whiskey) Fudge.  Made using the traditional method, this fudge recipe is delicious carrying the flavour and aroma of whisky.  It's perfect for offering as a gift to loved ones, or even treating yourself.

Specific Equipment
   Large heavy based pan, which holds a volume of at least 3L 
   Digital Sugar Thermometer (or see note e below)
   20cm x 20cm Brownie Tray (or similar)
Details
Prep time: Hands on time:     Yield: 40 - 50 pieces
Ingredients
  • 400ml Double Cream
  • 100ml Milk
  • 150g Unsalted Butter
  • 300g Caster Sugar
  • 300g Soft brown Sugar
  • small pinch of Salt
  • 40ml Whisky

Method
1. Prepare the tin. Lightly grease and fully line the brownie tin. Ensure that the greaseproof paper goes beyond the rim of the pan, this will help to remove the fudge once it has firmed up2. Melt the ingredients. Place the double cream, milk, butter and sugars into a heavy based pan. Place over a low heat to allow the ingredients to melt. Constantly stir using a wooden spoon. Ensure all of the ingredients have completely melted before moving onto the next stage - you should no longer hear or feel the granulation of the sugar. Pay particular attention to the 'corner' of the pan when listening for sugar granulation.3. Affix the sugar thermometer. Set the digital thermometer to 118C /244F and attach it to the side of the pan. Ensure that the thermometer is secure and not touching the base of the pan. (alternatively use a thermospatula which has the thermometer built into the spatula, or see note f below). 4. Boil. Increase the heat under the pan to allow it to come to the boil whilst stirring all of the time. Boil the mixture, whilst continuing to stir, until it reaches 118C / 244F. Please be careful - the mixture is very hot! You may find it helpful to wear an oven mitt in case of splashes from the sugar. 5. Leave alone. Once the required temperature has been reached, remove the pan from the heat and leave it undisturbed to cool down to 110C / 230F. This will only take a couple of minutes.6. Flavour the fudge. Add a small pinch of salt and the measured whisky to the pan. Be aware that the fudge will bubble up when the whisky is added! Mix well. 7. Beat. Beat the mixture with the wooden spoon vigorously until it is no longer shiny. 8. Pour into the prepared brownie pan. Pour the whisky fudge mixture into the prepared tin. Smooth it into the corners.9. Cool. Set aside to cool at room temperature for at least three hours to firm up.10. Slice in cubes. Once fully cold and firm use the excess greaseproof paper as handles to remove the fudge from the tin. Use a sharp knife to slice the fudge into bite sized pieces.11. Enjoy! 
Notes: a) Remember, this is incredibly hot! Do stir the syrup carefully so as to avoid splashing yourself. b) Keep animals, children and other vulnerable people out of the way when making fudge. c) When heating the mixture and waiting for it to reach 118C / 244F it will feel as though the temperature is stuck at around 104C / 220F for ages. Be patient and keep stirring, it will eventually move and will then increase fairly rapidly. d)  The sugar mixture is heated a little hotter than usual to account for the addition of a liquid (whisky).  Usually it is 116℃ / 241℉  e) Once portioned, store the fudge in an airtight container. It will be good for 1-2 weeks at room temperature but will last for up to 3 weeks if stored in the fridge. f) If you're making fudge without a thermometer, it can be tested by dropping a small amount of fudge into a glass of cold water. It will form a 'soft ball' (or if you prefer your fudge a little firmer aim for 'firm ball' stage) when it is ready. Have a few drinking glasses by your oven hob filled with cold water before starting to make your fudge. Before testing wait for the molten sugar to climb up the sides of the pan and then drop back down. Boil for a further 3-4 minutes and then start to test.





 

 

 

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How to make Whisky (Whiskey) Fudge, it's a great homemade confectionery to offer loved ones as an edible gift this Christmas.



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Cook Once Eat Twice hosted by Corina at Seaching for Spice

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18 comments:

  1. Ohh this sounds amazing! I do love fudge, definitely think I'd have to invest in a thermometer if I was going to attempt this! x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thankyou Jasmin, I'd definitely recommend using a sugar thermometer to be honest, then that way you're sure you've reached the right temperature. When I sharted trying to make fudge a couple of years ago I was following instructions of boiling it for x mins etc - and once I came to slice it into pieces it just wasn't set enough! I've not had a problem since using the thermometer.
      Angela x

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  2. This fudge looks absolutely yummy, I can think of lots of people who would love to receive this on Christmas Day!

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    Replies
    1. Aw thankyou Kat, it's been a great success here and with hubby's work colleagues too
      Angela xx

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  3. I'd love to try some of this Angela! I think homemade fudge makes such a lovely present and it's definitely something I'd like to try at some point. I think I've read all your fudge recipes this year and keep thinking it's something I need to have a go at. Thanks for sharing with #CookOnceEatTwice x

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    1. Ooh it sounds as though you definitely give it a go then Corina, afterall fudge makes a great gift for Christmas and I think it's made even more special when it's homemade :-)
      Angela x

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  4. This fudge looks so good, shiny, smooth and perfect caramel colored! I love the addition of whiskey to flavor it and make it perfect for the holiday season!

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    Replies
    1. Aw thankyou Deepika, the whisky really did give it a lovely flavour!
      Angela xx

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  5. I can't do fudge. It always looks so easy when other people do it, but mine never works! #CookBlogShare

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    1. Aw I wonder why it's not working fo you? I'd definitely recommend using a sugar thermometer if you aren't already Donna - the first few batches I tried a couple of years ago were complete failures because I was going off people's timings and of course it depends how hight the heat is and size of pan etc as to how fast the mixture get's the right 'soft' or 'hard' ball stage.
      Angela x

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  6. Goodness that looks yummy! The perfect texture..... so smooth and creamy. I am not a great whiskey lover, but I am sure I could find many an alternative spirit sub xx

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    Replies
    1. It's been a huge hit here Kate - both with hubby & I and his work colleagues! I don't think much work got done when he took that box of fudge in ;-) Lol! To be honest, I'm not a fan of whisky either, but once it was in the fudge the sweetness of the fudge seemed to temper the whisky although the flavour was still very much evident. But yes, I think there are definitely lots of spirits which would work really well instead of the whisky.
      Angela x

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  7. This looks so lovely, Angela - just as professional looking as you'd get in any shop - but I bet it tastes a whole lot better than shop bought! And I really love the idea of flavouring it with whisky. Though I am not sure I could bring myself sacrifice any of our single malts (Mr G and I are both BIG whisky fans)...but maybe the cheaper stuff!! Eb x

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    Replies
    1. Thankyou so much Eb :-D It's gone down a treat here & with Mr E's work colleagues! Mr E loves his whisky .... and dare I admit that I had to open a really nice new bottle for this batch! Oops!

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  8. Ih this is definitely my kind of Christmas treat, it looks so very tasty and would make a fabulous gift.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thankyou so much Jacqui, I packaged a few pieces up for my hairdresser and she was thrilled to receive it :-D
      Angela x

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  9. Oh my!!! YES PLEASE!!! I've only tried to make fudge once and it was a disaster! I need to have a go again. Thank you for sharing with #CookBlogShare x

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    1. Haha, I,m guessing this has you salivating at the mere thought Kisrsty :-D Fudge was always a failure for me until I invested in a decent sugar theremometer - it's soooo much easier to make now :-) Do give it another go Kirsty when you get chance.
      Angela x

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