Tuesday, 18 July 2017

Strawberry Baked Alaska

A Baked Alaska is perfect when you want to have some baking excitement in the kitchen!  A dome of ice cream sits on a sponge cake which is encased in a layer of marshmallow-y meringue before being baked in the oven!  It's the ultimate warm frozen dessert and is sure to wow your guests!   In this instance strawberry ice cream and sponge is used. 

How to make Baked Alaska - Strawberry sponge, topped with strawberry ice cream and encased in a marshmallow-y meringue before being baked in a relatively hot oven!  The ultimate warm frozen dessert!


Click to jump straight to the recipe!

You may think that Baked Alaska recipes are only for the foolhardy or those feeling brave.  Really brave.   After all, who in their right mind puts ice cream into a relatively hot oven?

But if you keep on reading, and trust me, you'll soon realise that you can confidently serve this warm frozen dessert to your guests for them to gasp and marvel at!

How to make Baked Alaska - Strawberry sponge, topped with strawberry ice cream and encased in a marshmallow-y meringue before being baked in a relatively hot oven!  The ultimate warm frozen dessert!

Ready to trust me?

So, here's the science bit.  Your ice cream won't melt in the oven because it is insulated by the meringue!  Easy eh! 

As long as you take care to ensure your ice cream is completely covered by the wonderful marshmallow-y meringue then you really won't be faced with cleaning up a pool of cream, that was referred to as ice cream just five minutes earlier, from the bottom of your oven.

How to make Baked Alaska - Strawberry sponge, topped with strawberry ice cream and encased in a marshmallow-y meringue before being baked in a relatively hot oven!  The ultimate warm frozen dessert!

My top tips for making a successful Baked Alaska.

shhhh it's just between you and me 😉
  1. Once you've completely covered your ice cream with meringue run your finger around the base of the meringue where it touches the presentation plate to seal in the ice cream.  This cuts out the risk of having a little gap at the base of the meringue which could potentially allow hot air to travel up to your ice cream.
  2. My second tip is to ensure your ice cream is completely frozen, pretty obvious really.  If you're making your own, like our strawberry ice cream, I'd recommend making it the day before you're planning on making the Baked Alaska to ensure it is completely frozen. 
  3. Thirdly, work swiftly when coating the ice cream and sponge cake with meringue.  That said, I took around four to five minutes to cover and check this one. 
How to make Baked Alaska - Strawberry sponge, topped with strawberry ice cream and encased in a marshmallow-y meringue before being baked in a relatively hot oven!  The ultimate warm frozen dessert!

Now, for those who may think I make Baked Alaskas all of the time - I don't.  Cakes and cupcakes yes, pastries yes, fruit crumbles most certainly.  In all honesty, because they're ordinarily too large just to serve Mr E & myself and aren't the sort of dessert which keeps well for obvious reasons, I can count on one hand the number of times I've made a Baked Alaska.  And for fear of sounding like I'm  blowing my own trumpet (which really isn't the intention) they have always turned out amazingly, with no escape of ice cream at all.  The point being, Baked Alaskas really aren't difficult to make.         

As I hope you can see from the photograph below, there is a tiny amount of melting ice cream around the side where it boarders the meringue but that's largely because I was messing around trying to take pictures (even if you're not a food blogger, or know one, I'm sure you can appreciate the issues of photographing ice cream!)

How to make Baked Alaska - Strawberry sponge, topped with strawberry ice cream and encased in a marshmallow-y meringue before being baked in a relatively hot oven!  The ultimate warm frozen dessert!

Of course, if you're still not convinced that the ice cream in your Baked Alaska would survive a hot oven, you could consider using a blow torch to colour the meringue - but honestly, where's the fun in that 😉 

Baked Alaskas are perfect when you want some baking excitement in the kitchen!  

How to make Baked Alaska - Strawberry sponge, topped with strawberry ice cream and encased in a marshmallow-y meringue before being baked in a relatively hot oven!  The ultimate warm frozen dessert!





So, here's how to make a Strawberry Baked Alaska





print recipe

Strawberry Baked Alaska
A Baked Alaska is the perfect bake when you want to have some fun in the kitchen!  A dome of strawberry ice cream sits on a strawberry sponge cake and is encased in a layer of marshmallow-y meringue before being baked in the oven!  It's the ultimate warm frozen dessert and is sure to wow your guests!

Details
Hands on time: about Bake time: 2    Yield: served 8 - 10 people

Specific Equipment
    1 x 18cm (7 inch) diameter Sandwich Tin
    1 x 20cm diameter Freezer Safe Bowl
    1 x oven safe Presentation Stand / Plate 
Ingredients
Ice Cream
For the Strawberry Sponge
  • 60g Butter, unsalted & chilled + extra for preparing the tin
  • 60g Golden Caster Sugar
  • 1 Egg, lightly beaten
  • small Pinch of Salt
  • 1/2 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • 60g SR Flour + extra for preparing the tin
  • 1 tbsp Milk
  • 3g Freeze Dried Strawberries
For the Swiss Meringue
  • 5 Egg Whites
  • 275g Caster Sugar

Method
1. Prepare the bowl to shape the ice cream. Line a 20cm diameter freezer safe bowl (we used a pyrex bowl) with 3 or 4 long strips of clingfilm. Allow the clingfilm to over hang the bowl. This excess clingfilm acts as hands to remove the ice cream from the bowl, as well as covering it.2. Prepare the ice cream. Either make homemade strawberry ice cream or use shop bought. Allow the ice cream to soften and transfer it to a 20cm diameter freezer safe bowl. Pack it in and aim to make the surface as level as you can. The bowl will be roughly half full.  Cover with a disc of greaseproof paper. Continue to cover the ice cream with the overhanging clingfilm. Cover the bowl with another piece of clingfilm. Place into the freezer, ensuring the bowl is level, at least overnight.
3. Preheat the oven to 190℃ / Fan 170℃ / Gas 5. 4. Prepare the cake tin. Grease the whole cake tin.  Base line it. Add half a teaspoon of flour into the cake tin. Standing over the sink, swirl the tin around to coat the sides of the tin with flour. Knock out any excess flour.5. Make the cake batter. Place the soft butter and sugar into a good sized bowl and beat together with a wooden spoon or electric beaters until very pale and fluffy. Add the salt and vanilla extract. Beat again to combine. Gradually add the beaten egg a little at a time, beating well after each addition, (see note b below). Add the freeze dried strawberries and mix in. Sieve the flour into the mixture. Use a spatula, large metal spoon or your hand with your fingers splayed to fold this in gently. Add a little milk and gently mix in until the batter has a dropping consistency.6. Fill the cake tin. Spoon the batter into the prepared cake tin. Spread the batter with the back of a spoon, creating a very slight indentation to the centre of the batter. This will help it bake level. Avoid overfilling your sandwich tin, you're aiming for it to be no more than two-thirds full.7. Bake. Place the cake tin in the centre of the oven and bake for about 16 - 20 minutes until golden brown, and the cake is slightly pulling away from the side of the tin. You may need to check the cake and rotate the tin after 14 minutes of baking. Once baked, remove from the oven and place onto a cooling rack. 8. Turn out the cake. Allow the cake to cool for 2 or 3 minutes before removing from the tin. Remove the greaseproof paper. Allow the cake to finish cooling. 9. Store the cake. Once the cake is completely cold, gently wrap in greaseproof paper and store in an airtight container until required. 
10. Pre-heat the oven to 220℃ / 425℉ / Gas 7. Consider the height of your Baked Alaska and the presentation stand you're using. Remove and reposition oven shelves as required.11. Prepare to make the Swiss meringue. Ensure that your bowl and beaters are scrupulously clean and free of any grease. Part fill a pan with water and sit the bowl over it to make a bain marie. Ensure the water in the ban doesn't touch the base of the bowl. Set the pan over a medium flame. 12. Make the Swiss meringue. Add the egg whites and all of the sugar to the bowl. Use the beaters to combine the sugar and egg whites. Continue beating. The egg whites will soon start to thicken, turn white and increase in volume. Constantly whip the egg whites to prevent them from cooking on the base of the pan. You're aiming for the sugar to completely dissolve into the meringue mixture. Test this by rubbing a little of the meringue between your fingers - it should no longer feel grainy. If using a sugar thermometer, the meringue should be 73c / 163F. This stage will take around 8-10 minutes.13. Continue beating the meringue. Place a piece of kitchen roll or a clean tea-towel onto your work surface. Once the sugar has fully dissolved remove the bowl from the pan and sit it on the prepared area. Continue beating the meringue until it has completely cooled. The meringue will thicken even more and will be glossy and shiny.
14. Begin to assemble the Baked Alaska. Position your cake sponge onto your chosen presentation stand. Remove the strawberry ice cream from the freezer. Use the excess clingfilm to lift the ice cream from the bowl. Peel away the cling film and greaseproof paper from the ice cream, being careful to ensure that it has all been removed. Place the frozen ice cream on top of the sponge. 15. Cover with meringue. Use a spoon or pallet knife to cover the ice cream and sponge with meringue. Gently run your finger around the edge of the dessert where the meringue touches the presentation plate to ensure the ice cream is completely sealed in. Also ensure the dome of meringue completely covers the ice cream.  Use the back of a spoon or pallet knife to create some texture and peaks to meringue if desired. 16. Bake. Place the presentation plate and Baked Alaska into the oven. Bake for 5-8 minutes until the meringue is golden brown. You may need to rotate the plate after 4 minutes.17. Enjoy! 
Notes: Cake batter. a) When making the cake batter, consider weighing the cracked eggs first to ensure the batter has equal weight of butter, sugar, flour and eggs. Simply weigh the butter, sugar and flour to the same weight as the eggs. Of course the value may be slightly different to the 60g listed in the ingredients above.  b) Consider warming your lightly beaten egg over a bain marie especially if it feels particularly cold. Warm it until it feels lukewarm. This should help prevent the batter from curdling and produce a better cupcake sponge. Meringue. c)  Swiss meringue is very thick and marshmallow-y.  It's perfect for a Baked Alaska or Pavlova, though feel free to make a French (classic) or Italian meringue (with hot syrup) if you prefer d) Ensure the bowl and beaters used for whipping the egg whites are scrupulously clean. e) Please be careful not to knock your bowl and pan of hot water over whilst beating the Swiss meringue. Assembly.  f)  Work swiftly when assembling the Baked Alaska.   g)  Consider piping some meringue onto the Baked Alaska, though use half the meringue to ensure it is completely sealed first.   Bake. i) Consider putting a baking tray in the bottom of the oven 'just in case', though if the ice cream is completely sealed in the meringue the ice cream will be insulated and will not leak out.  j)  You could use a blow torch to colour your meringue if you prefer.













Pin Strawberry Baked Alaska for later!

How to make Baked Alaska - Strawberry sponge, topped with strawberry ice cream and encased in a marshmallow-y meringue before being baked in a relatively hot oven!  The ultimate warm frozen dessert!



 Stay up to date with Only Crumbs Remain by subscribing!


If you do subscribe, thank you so much, and you can rest assured that I will only issue e-mails to yourself when a new post is published.  This is ordinarily about once or twice a week.

Simply enter your email address to get all of my latest recipes and blog posts direct to your inbox.




Rest assured that I will only use your email address to notify you of new posts on
Only Crumbs Remain.
You can opt out any time.

Delivered by FeedBurner




Useful Baking Equipment when making a Strawberry Baked Alaska

 


Please note, this is an Affiliate link. If you were to purchase one of these items I will receive a small percentage payment, though do rest assured that you won't be paying a penny more!   Thankyou for supporting Only Crumbs Remain.




This post has been shared with: 

 Bake of the Week co-hosted by Jenny at Mummy Mishaps & Helen at Casa Costello
Hijacked By Twins Link up your recipe of the week




Share this Post Pin This Share on StumbleUpon Share on Tumblr Share on DigItShare on Redditt Share on Google Plus Email This

30 comments:

  1. Hats off to you, I'm not sure I'd dare make a baked alaska...that's just asking for disaster...I get the whole science but, but still, I'd be scared! If ever I do get the urge to make one, though, I'll be coming here and following your recipe to the letter as this one looks fabulous! Out of interest, did you and Mr E manage to eat any of this one, or had it all melted by the time you'd managed to take all the photos? Eb x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aw thankyou Eb, honestly though it ont melt if it's encased :-D
      Hahaha, we did manage to enjoy a couple of slices yes. And they weren't even semi melted. I tried to take the sensible approach and set up the photo area before I did the meringue, assembly and bake (some thing which a lot of people seem to recomend regardless of what they're making). It would have beem a nightmare had it all melted by the time I'd finished messing around with the staging! Surprisingly it actually took ages and ages for the icecream to melt into a pool and it all be inedible (well unless you like melted icecream that is ;-) )

      Delete
  2. I just think of batman when I see bombe alaska - which might mean you have to be a superhero to make it :-) Seriously I am scared of making it not because the ice cream will melt but because you have to be so organised to get all the components together - it seems like something to make to wow guests but I am not sure if you could make it ahead - would you need to beat up the meringue just before it goes on the ice cream?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hahaha, trust me, I'm no super hero Johanna - at all :-) It's really not too time consuming to make. The ice cream obviously has to be made ahead of time - but that could be a week or more if you like. Likewise the sponge could be made the day before, or even taken from the freezer (though I'd personally defrost that before assembling). As for the meringue, well I personally whip up the meringue just before I want to cover the ice cream and bake it. It does take 15 minutes or so with the Swiss meringue, but that gives time to allow the main meal to start to digest a little if you are entertaining. This all said, I have read that some people assemble the whole baked alaska and pop it in the freezer until they want to bake it. I've never tried it and of course you'd need to be careful with the presentation plate you're using for thermal shock as well as having a space in the freezer.
      Angela x

      Delete
  3. baked Alaska reminds me of my childhood and when my mum would make this for dinner parties - sauce the decadent dessert back in the late 70's / early 80's! I made one back along for the bake off but I would love to make it again. it was so nice! Yours looks delicious - mmmm I think baked Alaska needs to make a come back x
    thanks for linking to #Bakeoftheweek x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha, I think you're right the Baked Alaska definitely does need to make a come back, it's to good to stay in the back of people's minds from decades ago.
      Angela x

      Delete
  4. This looks fantastic and you have made it sound very doable too. I know I'd have never attempted one of these before and it's still unlikely but I know if I wanted to I'd definitely feel more confident about it now! x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thankyou Corina, I'm glad it comes across as do-able. That was the intention, because it really is.
      Angela x

      Delete
  5. If I made this dessert I'd be the most popular mum ever - wait, maybe that's what I need to do to get the kids to listen to me more:) This cake is just indescribably appealing! Thank you for bringing it to #CookBlogShare:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hahaha, you'll have to try it Monika and let me know if if it has the desired effect :-) I know when i've made it for guests (adults though not children) before they've been like putty in my hands after enjoying this ;-)
      Thanls for your lovely comments,
      Angela x

      Delete
  6. That is a WOW factor dessert for sure! You do make it sound so easy peasy I tell you :) It looks fantastic and I bet it tastes gorgeous too especially as you've used your scrummy ice cream to make it. x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aw thankyou Jo, and I'm glad it comes across as easy - because it really is :-)
      Angela x

      Delete
  7. Angela - this is super impressive!! Looks awesome and I'm sure it tasted just as good. I'll have to study your recipe carefully before I decide if I can attempt this myself :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aw thankyou Debbie, that's so lovely of you .... and yes, it certainly did taste very good :-)
      Angela x

      Delete
  8. This Strawberry baked alaska is really awesome. It looks and sounds great recipe, but very difficult to make. You did a great job of making it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aw thankyou :-) though it's honestly not so difficult - much of it can be made ahead of time which makes life a lot easier :-)
      Angela x

      Delete
  9. My favourite Christmas dessert was 'ice cream cake' that my mum would make with a block of ice-cream, some trifle sponges and meringue! It was sort of poor-man's Baked Alaska! It is so easy to make, although it is really hard to find the block packets of ice cream these days! Loving the idea of strawberry ice-cream inside. My favourite 'block' was always Neapolitan!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah yes! A block of Neapolitan ice cream, now that brings back some fond memories for me too Kate. I think that ans raspberry ripple were my favourite as a child. You're so right, blocks of icecream are hard to come by these days - I was looking for one for my neighbour just a couple of wks ago. I love the idea of your mum's ice cream cake, it sounds as though it ws very special being made for Christmas :-)
      Angela x

      Delete
  10. This is such a WOW dessert Angela!! I would have been a bit scared to try this..because it sounds very technical to me.. But your tips and detailed recipe help a lot :) Thanks for sharing! I wish I could bite in this fluffy meringue dessert right away!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aw thankyou Deepika, I'm more than sure you'd be able to make a great Baked Alaska :-)
      Angela x

      Delete
  11. This is a bobby dazzler Angela.It belongs in a magazine.Absolutely stunning photos.You are a very talented lady!This is something I am always meaning to bake but ultimately too scared to do.Your recipe sounds very doable even for a first timer!I'm inspired xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aw thankyou Jenny, such lovely comments :-D
      I'd definitely recommend making one Jenny, espcially if it's on you're 'to make' list - they really aren't that difficult especially as much of it can be made ahead of time. Do share a pic with me if you decide to give Baked Alaska a whirl.
      Angela x

      Delete
  12. Wowsers I've always looked at Baked Alaska's and thought 'how is that even possible' , it baffles my brain how the ice cream doesn't melt.
    It looks like you've absolutely nailed this though Angela and it looks so so pretty with the strawberry ice cream :) yummm
    Betty x
    The Betty Stamp

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know, it's bizarre isn't it - you'd think there'd be a pool of melted icecream at the bottom of teh oven wouldn't you - meringue is just amazing how it insulates.
      Thanks you for the lovely comment Betty,
      Angela x

      Delete
  13. Wow! No matter how old I get, I still find Baked Alaska magical. I love the addition of Strawberry ice-cream. Thanks so much for sharing your tips too, Angela. #BakeoftheWeek

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aren't they just Helen, it's alsways so fascinating that the icecream survives being baked! You're welcome, and it's a pleasure to take part,
      Angela x

      Delete
  14. Absolutely stunning. Angela your recipes always blow me away. You're one very talented baker. Commenting at BritMums Baking Round-up Editor. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aw thankyou Julie, you're far too kind :-) I'm just a regular home baker :-)
      Angela x

      Delete

Thank you for spending your time to read my recipe posts. Feel free to leave a comment, I enjoy receiving your feedback. However, due to spam I have activated comment moderation, which simply means that each comment will be read by myself before it is visable on Only Crumbs Remain. I shall publish and respond to your valuable comments as soon as I can. So please don't panic when your comment disappears when you hit the publish button :-)

Flick through our recipes!