Friday, 16 September 2016

Savoury & Sweet Filled Yorkshire Puddings

Inspired by GBBO, these Yorkshire Puddings are filled two ways.  Firstly a savoury ratatouille style filling which is full of flavour, followed by macerated berries and chantilly cream which makes a lovely change to this usually savoury batter.

Yorkshire Puddings filled with macerated berries and chantilly cream

GBBO has seen some quite eventful changes this past week, but parking my personal thoughts aside let's focus on what's important.....the baking!

This week was a first for GBBO seeing the remaining bakers challenged with making three different batters.  The signature bake was to make 24 savoury filled Yorkshire Puddings.  Twelve lace pancakes were made in the technical challenge, and these were followed by the showstopper bake where they were challenged with making 36 churros.

Yorkshire Puddings filled with a delicious savoury rataouille mixture.

Being a Yorkshire lass, living in Yorkshire, it seemed fitting that I tackled Yorkshire Puddings for my Blogger's Bake-Off bake!  I absolutely LOVE Yorkshire Puddings, whether they're served at family gathering like Sunday lunch or during the Christmas festivities, or simply as a mid week meal with toad-in-the-hole, they're just so delicious.  Not only that, they're easy to make using just a handful of store cupboard ingredients.


I fondly recall making Yorkshire Puddings as a youngster with my Grandma.  We'd always make them well ahead of time, letting the batter rest before pouring it into a hot baking tray. In fact, last year I shared one of my Side-by-Side posts which explored the impact of resting the Yorkshire Pudding Batter.  There was a huge difference - not only with the obvious size difference but also in flavour and aroma!  The remaining batter I had from this bake was used as part of our evening meal, and after the 6 or 7 hour rest the resultant Yorkshires were even larger than these.

Yorkshire Puddings filled with a delicious savoury rataouille mixture.

Although Yorkshire Puddings are often considered a savoury accompaniment, which is probably why the GBBO challenge was to use a savoury filling, they can in fact be made into a dessert.  Many many moons ago, as a teen, I worked in a local pub as a waitress where we often served filled Yorkshire Puddings.  The puddings themselves were enormous, being the size of a dinner plate, and were found on both of the savoury and sweet menus.  The sweet Yorkshire puddings were very simply put together having been filled with some fruity jam and topped with squirty cream (well it was the late 1980's!).

Yorkshire Puddings filled with macerated berries and chantilly cream


My Yorkshire Puddings are filled two ways, savoury and sweet.  The savoury ones were filled with a simple, but incredibly delicious ratatouille.  Whereas the sweet ones were inspired by the puddings served at the pub I once worked.  They were filled with a little jam, macerated berries before being topped with chantilly cream.   Being just the two of us we had no call for making the quantity which the bakers were tasked to make in the tent, so this bake resulted in 4 savoury and 4 sweet filled Yorkshire Puddings.

Now, as we know batter week was a first for GBBO.  For me though, it was a first experience in creating a video where I show me (or rather my hands! - I wasn't brave enough to feature my face in the video) making our Macerated Berry & Chantilly Cream Filled Yorkshire Puddings especially for those who may have never made homemade Yorkshire Puddings before.  There's room for improvement (though isn't there always), but I'm pretty happy with the results :-)  



video

Let's get to it and baaaaaake




print recipe

Ratatouille Filled Yorkshire Puddings

Specific Equipment
Muffin Tray
Ingredients
For the batter
  • 2 tbsp Plain Flour
  • Pinch of Salt
  • 1 Egg, large
  • 80ml Milk
  • approx 6 tsp Vegetable / Sunflower Oil
For the ratatouille sauce
  • 1 tbsp Vegetable / Sunflower Oil
  • 1 Onion, finely chopped
  • Handful of Mushrooms, roughly chopped 
  • 3 baby courgettes, sliced
  • 1 x 400g Tin Plum Tomatoes
  • 1 dessertspoon Tomato Puree
  •    Garlic Puree, to taste
  •    1 Vegetable Oxo Cube
  •    small Pinch Celery Salt
  •    Splash of Water
  •    1 or 2 handful of Frozen Peas
  •    Basil Leaves

Method
1. Make the batter. Place the flour and salt into the bowl. Add the egg. Use a balloon or egg whisk to combine the flour with the egg to make a thick smooth paste. Slowly add the milk, whisking it into the flour mixture. You may not need all of the milk. You're aiming for the batter to be lump free and the consistency of double cream.2. Rest the batter. Cover the bowl and set aside to rest. Rest the batter for at least half an hour, though ideally for as long as you can (up to 24 hours).3. Make the ratatouille filling. Place the oil into a pan and set over a medium heat.  Add the onion and stir with a wooden spoon.  Allow to soften for a few minutes without colouring, stirring periodically.  Add the courgettes and mushrooms and continue cooking for a few more minutes, stirring periodically.  Add the tinned tomatoes.  Use a knife or scissors to break them up if they are whole.  Stir.  Add the tomato puree, garlic puree, oxo cube, and a small pinch of celery salt.  Stir again.  Add a splash of water and stir thoroughly.  Continue to cook over a medium heat for about 10 - 15 minutes, stirring periodically.  Turn off the heat and set aside until nearing ready to serve.  Before serving, re-heat the ratatouille and add the frozen peas. Stir and allow the peas to cook for 2 or 3 minutes.  Add a few torn basil leaves before serving.4. Pre-heat the oven to 240c / Fan 220 / Gas 9.5. Heat the muffin trays.  Add 1.5 tsp of oil to each of the muffin tray holes.  Place the tray in the oven, just above half way up.  Allow them to heat up for 10 minutes.6.  Prepare the batter.  Whisk the batter again for a few seconds with a balloon / egg whisk.  Pour the mixture into a Pyrex jug (or similar).7.  Bake the Yorkshire Puddings.Working quickly(but safely)  to avoid loosing too much heat from the oven, remove the muffin tray from the oven.  Close the oven door to keep the heat within.  Carefully swirl the tray a little to ensure the oil is covering all of the baking tray hollow. Pour the batter into the moulds so that they are about half full.  It should sizzle.  Place the tray back into the oven.  Avoid re-opening the oven door whilst the puddings bake.  Bake for 15 minutes until well risen and a deep golden brown.  remove from the oven. 8. Assemble. Fill the Yorkshire Puddings with some of the ratatouille and serve as desired, perhaps with new potatoes and vegetarian sausages. 


Notes:
a)  If you prefer bake the Yorkshire Puddings in a larger tray, though consider that this will require more oil and a longer bake.











print recipe

Macerated Berry & Chantilly Cream Filled Yorkshire Puddings

Specific Equipment
Muffin Tray
Ingredients
For the batter
  • 2 tbsp Plain Flour
  • 1 - 2 tsp Sugar
  • 1 Egg, large
  • 80ml Milk
  • approx 6 tsp Vegetable / Sunflower Oil
For the macerated berries
  • 300g Mixed Berries, such as Strawberries, Raspberries, Blueberries & Blackberries
  • 1 tbsp Sugar
  • drizzle Balsamic Vinegar
  • a few small Basil Leaves
  • 2 tbsp Jam, such as Strawberry or Raspberry 
For the chantilly cream
  • 150ml Double Cream
  • 1 - 2 tsp Icing Sugar
  • 1/2 tsp Vanilla Extract

Method
1. Make the batter. Place the flour and sugar into the bowl. Add the egg. Use a balloon or egg whisk to combine the flour with the egg to make a thick smooth paste. Slowly add the milk, whisking it into the flour mixture. You may not need all of the milk. You're aiming for the batter to be lump free and the consistency of double cream.2. Rest the batter. Cover the bowl and set aside to rest. Rest the batter for at least half an hour, though ideally for as long as you can (up to 24 hours).3. Pre-heat the oven to 240c / Fan 220c / Gas 9.4. Heat the baking trays. Add 1.5 tsp of oil to each of the muffin tray holes. Place the tray in the oven, just above half way up. Allow them to heat up for 10 minutes. 5. Prepare the batter. Whisk the batter again for 30 seconds with the balloon / egg whisk. Pour the mixture into a Pyrex jug (or similar).6. Bake the Yorkshire Puddings. Working quickly (but safely) to avoid loosing too much heat from the oven, remove the muffin tray from the oven. Close the oven door to keep the heat within. Carefully swirl the tray a little to ensure the oil is covering all of the muffin tray hollow. Pour the batter into the moulds so that they are about half full. It should sizzle. Place the tray back into the oven. Avoid re-opening the oven door whilst the puddings bake. Bake for about 15 minutes until well risen and a deep golden brown.  Remove from the oven and the muffin tray.  Sit each Yorkshire Pudding on a sheet of kitchen paper.  Allow to cool.7. Meanwhile macerate the berries. Chop 3/4 of the berries and place into a bowl. Scatter over the sugar. Drizzle over a little balsamic vinegar. Gently stir together to combine. Tear up two or three small basil leaves and stir through. Set aside. 8. Make the chantilly cream. Pour the cream into a bowl. Add the icing sugar and vanilla extract. Use a balloon or egg whisk to beat the cream until it thickens. Avoid over beating.9. Prepare the jam. Spoon the jam into a small bowl. Stir it with a spoon to break it down a little, adding a splash of water to slacken it if necessary. Stir to combine. 10. Assemble. Once the Yorkshire Puddings have cooled, place a spoonful of the prepared jam into the base of pudding. Add some of the macerated berries. Top with the double cream. Serve with some more fresh berries.


Notes:
a)  Assemble just before serving to prevent the puddings spoiling from the moisture of the fruit. b)  If you prefer bake the Yorkshire Puddings in a larger tray, though consider that this will require more oil and a longer bake.















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Yorkshire Puddings filled two ways:  with a delicious ratatouille mixture suitable for vegetarians and a sweet mixture of macerated berries and chantilly cream





This post has been shared with:

Great Bloggers Bake off hosted by Jenny over at Mummy Mishaps 


 The Bake Off Bake along,co-hosted by Amanda at Rhyme and Ribbons and Ala at This Particular

 Meat Free Mondays hosted by Jacqueline over at Tinned Tomatoes

Simple and in Season hosted by Katie over at Feeding Boys

CookBlogShare Charlotte's Lively Kitchen - #TheFoodCalendar







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24 comments:

  1. My husband said we should make sweet Yorkshire puddings, but I wanted to make savoury, as it was the challenge at Bake Off. I will have to bake another batch for him and your Berry & Chantilly Cream filling sounds amazing. He might like that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ooh definitely give the sweet ones a try Anca, they certainly make a lovely change to the usual savoury ones. Thanks for popping by and commenting,
      Angela x

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  2. Oooh - real Yorkshire puddings from a real Yorkshire lass! They look fabulous - I love how big and puffy you get them. They both sound delicious, but I like the sound of the sweet ones especially :-) And well done on your first video - can't believe it's only your first, it's really well done - you look and sound like you've been doing them for much longer! It's lovely to hear your voice too :-) I would love to do videos but I still haven't quite got round to it!! One day I will get there :-) Eb x

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    Replies
    1. Aw thank you Eb :-) I must admit that I usually use an actual Yorkshire Pudding pan when we make them, so they end up larger still. But trying to make them a little 'prettier' for the GBBO bake I thought I'd use a muffin pan - as you say they still come up a good size. Oooh yes, those sweet ones were great, they were gorgeous teamed with the macerated berries.
      Thank you again Eb. Hahaha, you don't know how many 'takes' the video took ;-) Seriously!! The second part of the video needed fewer 'takes' thankfully. Actually, Mr E and my mum commented that it didn't sound like me! When my brother suggested doing a video for the blog months ago I dismissed it for various reasons, but over the months the idea gradually didn't seem quite as 'scary', and having watched GBBO and feeling confident with my Yorkshires I had an impulse thought of doing the video. To be honest I was pleasantly surprised how much I enjoyed making it and am thinking of other instances where I can make another and improve on the outcome :-)
      Thanks for your really lovely comment Eb,
      Angela x

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  3. Ohh these look fab! I've actually never made yorkshire puddings myself, need to give it a go, I'm desperate to make a good toad in the hole!

    Jasmin Charlotte

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    Replies
    1. Ooh you definitely must give homemade toad in the hole a try! Definitely scrummy as you say, and perfect now that we're entering Autumn. Perhaps you could make the batter before you set off for the day (it only takes a couple of minutes) and then it'll definitely have had a good test by the time you come to bake them later in the day :-) Would love to see how you get on with them.
      Angela

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  4. Love the thought of sweet Yorkshire puddings - although I also love the sound of your savoury ratatouille filling too. I went savoury for my filling - hoping to find time to post it today! Thanks for linking with #CookBlogShare

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    Replies
    1. That ratatouille filling was absolutely delicious, certainly something we'll be doing again. And the sweet ones were gorgeous with the fresh berries against the scrummy Yorkshires. I'll certainly keep my eyes peeled for your savoury Yorkshires, looking forward to seeing what you've used in them.
      Thanks for your lovely comment Mandy,
      Angela x

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  5. Gorgeous and lovely to see sweet Yorkshire puddings too x

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    Replies
    1. Than k you Cathy, those sweet ones made a lovely change :-)
      Angela x

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  6. These sound gorgeous and your video is so good, you should be so proud of yourself! I know plenty a Yorkshire man who would have yorkshire's with their roast and then left over yorkshire's with jam afterwards!

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    Replies
    1. Aw thankyou Hannah :-) I have to say those jam filled Yorkshires were very pupular when I worked at the pub all those yrs ago. I seem to think they also offered it with golden syrup as well!
      Thanks for your lovely comments,
      Angela x

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  7. see both fillings and puddings sound and look very delicious i would be unable to choose between sweet or savoury, so I would need to try both! that is a great tip about leaving the batter to rest, i will remember that next time i make some.
    i will watch your video too
    thank you for linking up xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. hahaha, a girl after my own heart trying both the sweet and savoury Yorkshire Pud :-) Resting the batter was how I was taught to make them as a child, I'm not sure why it helps (though comments following my side-by-side post on the subject think it may be to do with fermentation), whatever the reason it definitely makes a difference.
      Thanks for popping by Jenny,
      Angela x

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  8. Your Yorkshires look amazing, you have done you your home county proud. Although I have heard of sweet Yorkshire pud fillings as yet I haven't tried one but now seriously tempted

    Great video too, wouldn't know it was your first. You have a lovely natural persona. Look forward to seeing more.
    Ive been thinking I must do some video work but haven't got around to it but like you was thinking hand only.

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    1. I have to admit that sweet Yorkshire were new for my taste buds too, but they were absolutely delicious, after all it's only a simple batter like pancake and waffle which many of us enjoy as a dessert anyway.
      Aw thank you Jacqueline, I wasn't brave enough to get my face on there, but my reasoning is that the focus should be on the ingredients rather than my face, well that's my excuse anyway ;-) You'll definitely have to give it a go, it's great fun :-)
      Thanks for your really lovely comments,
      Angela x

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  9. Great-looking Yorkies! I think we all went Yorkie-mad this week!
    Loving the sound of your sweet-filled berry Yorkshires, especially with the addition of the basil and balsamic.... Yum! x

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    Replies
    1. Hahaha, you're right the nation certainly did seem to go a bit Yorkie-mad this week :-)
      Angela x

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  10. Love the sound of both of your filled Yorkshires Angela, they make a great meal together as well!

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    1. Wouldn't they just ....it'd be so easy to make a little bit more batter to finish things off with them filled with berries.
      Thanks for popping by,
      Angela x

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  11. I love the idea of the sweet Yorkshire pudding. I've never tried one but I'd imagine they work a lot like pancakes where there's no sugar in the batter but they're perfect as a sweet treat because of the toppings.

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    Replies
    1. That's just what i thought when I was toying with what flavours to use in my Yorkshire Puds. As you say they are just like a pancake or a waffle really - just a slightly different thickness to the uncooked batter.
      Angela x

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  12. I love the idea of your berry and cream Yorkshires! x

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Amanda, ...they were super yummy :-)
      Angela x

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