Tuesday, 28 June 2016

Homemade Orange Curd

Containing less refined sugar than lemon curd, this reduced sugar orange preserve is delicious both spread on toast and used as an element within cakes and bakes.  It makes a lovely alternative to the usual lemon curd.

Recipe for homemade reduced sugar orange curd


 One of my favourite preserves for topping my morning round of toast is undoubtedly lemon curd, but having an idea for a Apricot & Orange Frangipane Tart rattling around my head, which includes an orange element, I set to and made a homemade batch of orange curd.  Not only is it as delicious as its cousin, lemon curd, it also contains far less refined sugar. 


Orange Curd is delicious spread onto toast and used to sandwich cakes.

Never having made an orange curd before, I carried out a little search on Google and noticed that in the recipes I read people were commenting that the orange curd was far too sweet.  So baring that in mind and realising that oranges are obviously naturally sweet compared to lemons I knew that my go-to lemon curd recipe would need adjusting to cater for the different sweetness level of oranges.

As somebody who enjoys her sweet bakes and desserts I must admit that I was a little surprised by how much less sugar this orange curd actually needed.  To be specific, our lemon version used 225g of sugar compared to 150g in the orange version.   That's a massive 75g less!   To be honest, the refined white sugar really wasn't missed, the Orange Curd simply doesn't need it due to the oranges being naturally sweeter than the lemon.  In fact, those of you who have less of a sweet tooth than me, may even be able to reduce the 150g even further without feeling that you were compromising too much.  However, if you fancy your curd a little sweeter, you can easily add a little more to suit your own preference (I outline how to do this within the recipe).
   
Homemade Orange Curd recipe


Without any compromise on taste, this reduced sugar orange curd is delicious.  It is lovely both spread onto a round of toast and used in bakes.  It would look fabulous topped with a pretty preserve cover and offered as a homemade gift to foodies.
     


So let's get to it and bake! 


Homemade Orange Curd.     Yum

Homemade Orange Curd recipe

Yield: approx 500g Orange Curd
Difficulty: Easy 
Time: hands on time about 40 - 45 minutes; cooling time.
Storage: In an airtight jar in the fridge for 2 weeks.

You will need:

Pan
Heatproof Bowl
Wooden Spoon
Sieve
Sterilised Jars / Kilner Jars
Wax seals and cellophane or jam jar lids
Heat proof pouring jug (ie Pyrex)

For the orange curd

125g Unsalted Butter, cubed
150g Caster Sugar (plus a spoon or two extra if it isn't sweet enough for your preference)
2 large Oranges, zest & juice
3 large Eggs, lightly beaten
1 capful Orange Extract


How to make it:

1.  Sterilise the jars.  Heat the oven to 140c /120 fan / Gas 1.  Wash the jam / kilner jars and lids (if using) by either placing them in hot soapy water or in the dish washer for a hot wash.  Rinse them well.  Without drying them lay the jars and lids on a tray (for ease of moving them) and place in the warm oven to dry completely.  If you're using kilner jars, boil the rubber seal as dry heat can damage them.

2.  Set up the bain marie.  Select a pan which allows your heatproof bowl to sit on the pan safely.  Quarter fill the pan with water.  Ensure that once the bowl is positioned on top of the pan the base of the bowl doesn't touch the water.  Place the pan on the hob over a medium heat.  Add the cubed butter, sugar, orange zest, orange juice and orange extract to the bowl and suspend over the pan.  

3.  Allow the butter and sugar to melt.  Stir the mixture frequently with a wooden spoon whilst the butter melts.  Keep the pan on the medium heat until the sugar has completely dissolved, you will no longer feel or hear any granulation from the sugar.   Use a teaspoon to taste the mixture, add more sugar if it isn't to your preference, allowing it to fully dissolve before moving to the next stage. (see note b).  Remove the bowl from the pan and set onto a cloth.  Reduce the heat under the pan.

4.  Add the eggs.  Strain the lightly beaten eggs through a sieve (to remove any shell or sinew) into the bowl.  Stir with the wooden spoon.

5.  Cook slowly.  Replace the bowl on the pan.  Constantly stir the mixture whilst it slowly cooks.  Gradually it will begin to thicken.  It is ready when you are able to draw a clear line with your finger through the mixture on the back of the wooden spoon.  This stage took me 35 minutes.

6.  Decant into jars.  Ladle the cooked hot curd into the pyrex jug and then pour into the sterilised jars.   Whilst the curd is still hot seal the jars with a wax disc (wax side down) and slightly moistened cellophane held in place with an elastic band.  Alternatively use the sterilised jar lids.  Allow the curd to fully cool before placing in the fridge.



Enjoy!


Notes:

a)  The jars I used for this batch of lemon curd are simply used jam jars.  Avoid using jars which have previously contained strong flavoured food or tomato sauces in them as the aroma is unlikely to have been removed even with thorough washing.
b)  When sampling the curd in step 3 consider that tasting at this stage will only give you a guideline to the final sweetness level as the flavours will develop and alter further during the cooking.   









 

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This recipe for low sugar orange curd is absolutely delicious.  It makes a lovely change to lemon curd.  It can be used to spread on toast in a morning, used in a ranges of bakes, or even given to a foodie as a homemade gift





This post has been shared with: 

  Cook Once eat Twice hosted by Corina over at Searching for Spice

CookBlogShare Tasty Tuesdays on HonestMum.com





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18 comments:

  1. Another gorgeous looking curd. I really must try to make some soon. I wonder if you can use raspberries?

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    Replies
    1. I've never tried making one with raspberries Alison, but I would imagine that it would work. It'd make a great colour!
      Thanks for popping by and commenting,
      Angela x

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  2. This looks and sounds great, Angela. I love how much less refined sugar it needs compared to the lemon curd. And given I don't have much of a sweet tooth I reckon I might even be able to reduce it more! I love the idea of a raspberry curd too. I'm sure there are many other possibilities too - Lime? Grapefruit? Oooh - what about blood orange? That would make for a fab colour too! Eb x

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    Replies
    1. Ooh yeah, blood orange sounds a great idea! I have actually seen loads of curd recipes made with different fruits over the past months, including, I believe, rhubarb - another great colour - I've only tried the lemon and orange so far.
      I recon you would definitely be able to reduce the sugar content further Eb without it feeling like you were compromising. In fact I though of you as I wrote that part of the post knowing that you don't really have a sweet tooth.
      Thanks for popping by Eb,
      Angela x

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  3. i don't think i have ever tried orange curd, but i know i would like it as i love lemon curd and i love orange flavour. i really should try to make some, as you make it seem very easy. the colour is just a delight :) yummy x

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    Replies
    1. Ooh it certainly sounds as though you should give it a whirl Jenny, it really is yummy though clearly not as sharp as lemon curd. Yes, I think it is straighforward to make as long as you do it slowly so not to scramble the eggs. I'm lead to believe that it can infact be made in a microwave on short bursts of low heat with regular stirring if you don't fancy standing so long with the slow cooking. This said I've not tried it that way as we don't have a microwave - the fanciest gadget we have in a stick blender ;-)
      Thanks for your lovely comment Jenny,
      Angela x

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  4. Delicious! I've never tried making Orange Curd! Such a great twist on a classic recipe! #CookBlogShare

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    Replies
    1. It certainly is a little different to the usual lemon curd, and of course there are so many other fruits which would lend themselves to making a yummy curd from :-)
      Thanks for popping by and commenting Cliona,
      Angela x

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  5. I've never made curd before but I do love it and especially like the fact that this is not too sweet or at least naturally sweetened by the oranges themselves! Thanks for sharing with #CookOnceEatTwice

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    1. I really was pleasantly surprised by how much less sugar I needed to use to make the same volume of orange curd as I make for the lemon version, and this is coming from a girl who certainly does have a sweet tooth.
      Thanks for hosting a great linky Corina,
      Angela x

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  6. Lovely! I don't think I have ever tried orange curd. The last curd I made was pineapple flavoured. It didn't work particularly well (way too runny) but it tasted amazing incorporated into banana bread!

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    1. Ooh pineapple curd on banana bread sounds a brilliant idea Jo. Did you add a little lemon juice or even use a few lemon pips to help it thicken?
      Thanks for popping by,
      Angela x

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  7. Never tried orange curd, only lemon, have to x

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    Replies
    1. It makes a lovely change Vicki, hipe you enjoy it as much as we have :-)
      Angela x

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  8. This sounds so good Angela. I've never actually made my own curd and this sounds like a great way to start. #CookBlogShare

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Mandy, it's really not difficult - despite a whole lot of stirring ;-)
      Thanks for popping by,
      Angela x

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  9. Ooooh Angela this sounds so good! I bet it is delicious spread on warm toast! Thank you for sharing with #CookBlogShare x

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    Replies
    1. It certainly has been delicious in warm toast Kirsty, and made a lovely change to the usual lemon curd.
      Thanks for your lovely comment kirsty,
      Angela x

      Delete

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