Monday, 30 May 2016

Lemon Mousse Cake

This delicate & airy genoise birthday cake was brought to life with the lashings of lemon curd held within the light mousse.  Being made with aquafaba, the delicious lemon mousse is free of raw eggs making it safe for many groups in our communities. 

Lemon Mousse Cake, made with a genoise sponge and a lemon mousse containing aquafaba making it safe for for those vulnerable to raw eggs

Earlier this month saw David, our dear friend and neighbour, celebrate his 81st birthday.  Being a firm believer that birthday celebrations are never complete without a cake I donned my pinny and got into the kitchen to bake.

Knowing that David has a fondness for lemon flavours and light cakes in particular I searched through my extensive collection of baking books and came across a recipe for a version of a lemon chiffon cake, in 'Cakes & Cake Decorating'.  The image for the cake showed it presented simply with no fuss.  It really did look delicious with a thick layer of lemon mousse sandwiched within a straightforward swiss roll type of sponge.  However, as I read the method it became clear that the recipe was far from suitable for our elderly neighbour due to the raw eggs within the mousse layer.  The mousse also contained gelatin which, living in a vegetarian household, is a product which I clearly don't use.  The cake obviously needed modifying to suit the specific needs of David and of course ourselves.



Lemon Mousse Cake, made with a genoise sponge and a lemon mousse containing aquafaba making it safe for for those vulnerable to raw eggs.

Our, or rather David's,  Lemon Mousse Cake was made with a genoise sponge. The butter added to a genoise cake not only brings a little extra moisture and flavour to the sponge but also prevents it from spoiling as fast as a swiss roll type of bake.  The light lemon mousse filling was adapted from the vegetarian egg free mousse I used in our Triple Chocolate and Mango Tart.  A generous amount of homemade lemon curd was incorporated into a lightly whipped double cream.  Beaten aquafaba was then added in place of raw eggs.  The cake also contained a layer of the homemde lemon curd bringing an extra lemony flavour to the affair. 

Lemon Mousse Cake, made with a genoise sponge and a lemon mousse containing aquafaba making it safe for for those vulnerable to raw eggs

Although aquafaba was discovered in the vegan world it definitely has worthwhile benefits for the elderly, like David, and also for those who are very young, pregnant or living with a compromised immune system.  For those who haven't come across this wonder, aquafaba is the often disposed of liquid which surrounds tinned beans (not baked beans!)  Believe it or not, it can be used in the same way as we use egg whites!  It makes great meringues, macarons, mousses, pasta... the list is endless!  Although any bean liquid can be used, chickpea water does seem to be the preferred choice.   I must admit that it does take a little longer to whip up than the conventional egg white, and for that reason I would definitely suggest using electric beaters rather than a balloon whisk which would certainly give your arms a workout.  Once the aquafaba has been whisked with the icing sugar (and white wine vinegar to stabilise) and then combined with other flavours, such as the lemon curd and double cream like in this lemon mousse, any strange flavour detected in the aquafaba's liquid form is certainly no longer noticeable.

Lemon Mousse Cake, made with a genoise sponge and a lemon mousse containing aquafaba making it safe for for those vulnerable to raw eggs

The birthday boy, David, was delighted to have received a cake to celebrate his big day and, like us, thoroughly enjoyed the clear lemon flavours housed within the light and airy genoise sponge.



So, let's get to it and bake!


Lemon Mousse Cake     Yum

Yield: 1 x 20cm cake
Lemon Mousse Cake, made with a genoise sponge and a lemon mousse containing aquafaba making it safe for for those vulnerable to raw eggs
Serves: 10
Difficulty: Moderate 
Time: hands on time about 35 minutes (longer if making your own curd); plus 20-25 minutes bake time; cooling time.
Freezable: Yes, undecorated  
Inspired by:  'Lemon Chiffon Cake' in the book Cakes and Cake Decorating

You will need:

20cm Springform Cake Tin
Greaseproof Paper
Large Glass Mixing Bowl
2 x Medium Mixing Bowls
Pan
Electric Hand Held Beaters
Tea Towel
Sieve
Spatula or large metal Spoon
Balloon Whisk
Serrated Bread Knife
Piping Bag
Plain Round Nozzle (I used number 12)


For the sponge mixture

4 medium eggs
65g Golden Caster Sugar
60g Caster Sugar
125g Plain Flour (I used gluten free) + 1 tsp for greasing
32g Unsalted Butter + extra for greasing

For the Lemon Mousse & finishing the cake

50ml aquafaba liquid (ideally from a can of unsalted chickpeas)
50 Icing Sugar
1/2 tsp White Wine Vinegar
approx 3/4 jar Lemon Curd (either shop bought or homemade lemon curd
300ml Double Cream


How to make it:

1.  Pre-heat the oven to 200c / Fan 180c / Gas 6.

2.  Prepare the cake tin.  Grease the inside of the cake tin thoroughly and line the base with greaseproof paper.  Place the teaspoon of flour into the greased cake tin and, holding it on its side and over the sink, tap the cake tin so that the flour adheres to the greased sides of the tin.  Knock out any excess flour.

3. Weigh the cake ingredients.  Have all of your cake ingredients ready as you need to work swiftly once the batter has been beaten to help reduce the loss of volume.  Sieve the flour 3 times.  Fold a tea towl into quarters and place on the work surface.

4.  Melt the butter.  Place the butter into a small pan and set over a low heat to slowly melt.  Remove from the heat once it has melted and set aside.

5.  Make the sponge.  Add some water to the pan so that it is no more than a quarter full.  Break the eggs into a large glass bowl and suspend this bowl over the pan.  Ensure the water in the pan doesn't touch the bowl.   Place the pan over a low heat on the hob.  Using the electric beaters (or balloon whisk if you're feeling energetic) lightly whisk the eggs.  Add the two sugars and continue beating on a medium setting for about 7 minutes.  The egg mixture will initially be frothy, but will gradually become thicker the longer the mixture is beaten.  You're aiming for ribbon stage.  This is where the mixture leaves a trail on the surface when the beaters are lifted.  You should be able to write the number 8 without the ribbon sinking into the mixture until the number has been completed.

6.  Fold in the flour and butter.  Remove the bowl from the pan and sit it on the tea towel.  Pour the butter down the side of the bowl into the mixture so that it's not landing directly onto the top of the aerated batter.  Sieve the flour into the mixture.  Using a spatula or large metal spoon start to gently fold the flour and butter into the mixture.  Ensure you get to the bottom of the bowl where flour can become trapped.  Avoid over working the mixture.  The batter will deflate a little during this process, but do aim to work gently yet speedily.

7.  Fill the cake tin.  Pour the batter into the prepared cake tin from a low height.

8.  Bake.  Place the cake tin in the centre of the oven and bake for about 20 minutes.  It will be baked when the cake is golden brown and slightly shrinking away from the sides.  Remove from the oven and place on a cooling tray.  After a couple of minutes, unclip the cake tin and gently remove from the cake.  Use a fish slice (or similar) to gently remove the sponge from the base of the cake tin.  Allow the cake to to fully cool on the cooling rack.

9.  Start making the lemon mousse.   Place the measured liquid from the chickpeas into a bowl and beat with the electric beaters until firm.  Add the icing sugar a teaspoonful at a time, beating well after each addition.  Add the white wine vinegar and beat for a further minute.  The meringue should be thick and glossy now.  Set aside.

9.  Continue making the lemon mousse.  Pour the double cream into another bowl and beat with a balloon whisk to soft peaks, avoid over beating.   Add 10 tsp lemon curd (see note a) and mix gently to combine.  Don't worry if the cream has become a little thick at this stage as the aquafaba will slacken it a little.  Add one third of the aquafaba meringue and mix together to slacken the mixture.  Add the remaining aquafaba and gently fold together with a spatula until combined.  Taste and add a little more lemon curd if required.

10.  Begin to assemble the lemon mousse cake.  Once the cake is fully cold place it onto the board / stand you want to serve it on.   Use a serrated bread knife to cut the cake in half horizontally.   Carefully set the top half aside.  Spread a little lemon curd onto the cut surface of the cake and spread out almost to the edge with a pallet knife or back of a spoon (see note a).

11.  Complete assembling the lemon mousse cake.  Spoon the lemon mousse filling into a piping bag fitted with a plain round nozzle.  Pipe 'blobs' of the mouse onto the lemon curd layer, aiming to keep the blobs fairly close together and as neat as possible along the exposed edge.  Place the top half of the cake onto the filled base, ideally in the same orientation that it was removed.  Starting in the centre of the cake pipe blobs of the lemon mousse to the top surface, aiming to keep them all roughly the same size.  Continue until the whole of the top of the cake is covered.  Place 2 tsp lemon curd into a small bowl.  Add two of drops of water to slacken and stir, you're aiming for a fairly runny consistency.  Use a teaspoon to drizzle the runny lemon curd over the top of the cake. 


Enjoy!

Notes:

a)  Some shop bought lemon curds can be particularly thick, if this is the case spoon the curd into a small bowl and add half a teaspoon of water and stir to combine.  You're aiming for a nice spreadable consistency which won't pull at the cake crumb when spread. Add a little more water if necessary.
b) Consider finishing the cake with some crystallised lemon zest.







 

 

 

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This lemon mousse cake is a delicate & airy genoise birthday cake which was brought to life with lashings of lemon curd held within the light mousse.  Being made with aquafaba, the delicious lemon mousse is free of raw eggs making it safe for many groups in our communities

 

 

This post has been shared with: 

Bumpkin Betty's Baking Club, who's theme this month is 'free from'.  Even if you're not a blogger you can take part on facebook.

Bake of the Week co-hosted by Helen at Casa Costello and Sara at Maison Cupcake.  (Hosted by Helen this week) 

Sunday Fitness & Food Link-Up co-hosted by Angela at Marathons & Motivation and Ilka at Ilka's Blog
 
Link up your recipe of the week CookBlogShare Tasty Tuesdays on HonestMum.com





        
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24 comments:

  1. What a great idea to use aquafaba! With my Mum being allergic to egg I always shy away from recipes that use loads of them, or particularly if they're left raw in the recipe. I became aware of using chickpea water recently because one of my favourite food bloggers posted pictures of a gorgeous-looking vegan meringue [ https://www.instagram.com/p/BEl61AVx_Vd/?taken-by=linda_lomelino ], but it left me wondering exactly how she did it! Thanks for a great recipe and inspiration, Angela :)

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    1. You're welcome Hannah :-) It's amazing how many uses there is for aquafaba, you'll definitely have to get a can or two of unsalted chickpeas when your exams are over Hannah so you can make some egg free creations for your mum. That image on Instagram is beautiful, I can certainly see why it stuck in your mind.
      Thanks for popping by and I'm looking forward to seeing what you make with it.
      Angela x

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  2. wow this looks so professional! I ended up binning my aquafaba that I'd saved in the freezer as i needed the freezer space but i am tempted to one day try an aquafaba recipe. x

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    1. Aw thank you Rebecca, you're too kind :-) It's amazing stuff, there's so many things which can be made with it. Your diners / guests would never know what you'd used.
      Thanks for popping by Rebecca, and for your kind comments,
      Angela x

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  3. Not tried it before but Im pinning this a a useful recipe to have. Thank you

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  4. Yey - aquafaba strikes again! What a beautiful cake and what a kind gesture - so pleased David enjoyed his cake! :-) Eb x

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Eb :-) To be honest, I think had we not baked for him his day would have sadly been like the other 364 days of the year! He and his dog live alone & he is housebound, so having done the vast majority of this shopping for him over the past 3 years or so we've got to know one another well.
      Three cheers for aquafaba :-)
      Thanks for your lovely comments Eb,
      Angela x

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  5. A gorgeous looking cake Angela, I'm sure David was delighted! So intrigued by Aquafaba, must do some experimenting. #CookBlogShare

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    1. Thank you Mandy. Aquafaba is amazing, there are so many things which I believe can be made from the liquid we usually throw away.
      Thanks for your lovely comment,
      Angela x

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  6. Ooooh Angela this cake is just perfect! I have never used aquafaba but have recently seen a few recipes using it, I must have a go x #cookblogshare

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    1. Thank you Kirsty :-) You definately should have a play with aquafaba - after all it comes free with a can of beans ;-)
      Thanks for your lovely comment Kirsty,
      Angela x

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  7. This looks yummy Angela. I love the idea of incorporating lemon curd with the whipped cream, definitely doing this on my next lemon bake :) Chonnie xx

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    1. Thank you Chonnie. I just love using lemon curd when I can in bakes, I always find that it brings a lovely flavour and of course so many people love lemon curd :-)
      Thanks for popping by and commenting,
      Angela x

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  8. i think the grand age of 81 definitely deserves a wonderful cake and your chiffon lemon mousse cake looks so summery and perfect for such an occasion. Many happy returns to your friend x Thanks so much for joining in with #BakeoftheWeek once again x

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    1. I totally agree that he deserved a birthday cake having reached the age of 81. He loves his lemon flavours so it went down well with him and the rest of his friends. I shall pass your birthday withes onto him Helen :-)
      Thanks for hosting Helen,
      Angela x

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  9. I love lemon cakes, I often choose them over chocolate. I've always meant to try making a genoise sponge but never seem to get around to it. Great to make mousse without raw egg, makes it much more flexible who you can feed it to! Thanks for joining in with #BAKEoftheWEEK !

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    Replies
    1. I totally agree Sarah, I usually opt for a lemon dessert over a chocolate cake or pudding, I often find the flavours of a lemon cake / dessert so much more refreshing. Ooh you definately need to make a genoise when you get chance, they're so delicious and make a great summery cake. I love making mousses now that I've found aquafaba - OH isn't keen on the idea of eating raw or lightly cooked eggs.
      Thank for popping by and of course for hosting with Helen,
      Angela x

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  10. What a fab recipe Angela, such a good idea to have an alternative to raw eggs. I love your detailed instructions, so helpful, I have definitely got to try aquafaba x

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    1. Aw thank you Sarah, aquafaba really does make a great alternative either for vegans or those who need to avoid raw eggs. I can't quite believe how versatile it is. Thank you Sarah, I do like to include as much detail as I can in my recipes, despite it making them look long. That extra information may just be the thing which helps a slightly less experienced baker create a successful bake.
      Thanks for your lovely comments Sarah,
      Angela x

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  11. Oh, yum! This looks amazing. Pinning so I can make it later. What an awesome summer recipe :)

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    1. Aw thank you Tiffany, I hope you enjoy it as much as David, his family and we did :-)
      Angela x

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  12. This cake is Gorgeous! I always love your posts as you have great recipes, but I always learn something new. I had never heard the term aquafaba before, but what a great idea. Thanks so much for sharing. Pinned & stumbled :-)

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    1. Thank you Angela :-) You'll certainly have to have a play around with aquafaba, it's seriously amazing stuff and just think we usually drain it away when we open a can of beans.
      Thanks for pinning and stumbling, and for your lovely comment :-)
      Angela x

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